Dating from 1833 these buildings sit on the crest of a small rise. The church is surrounded by a graveyard with inscriptions which date back to 1836.

DEDICATED TO PRESERVING THESE NATIONALLY IMPORTANT BUILDINGS AND GRAVEYARD

These are the foundation stones of corporate agriculture in Australia, laid by free and convict pioneers.

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The church was built as the chapel of the Australian Agricultural Company by Sir Edward William Parry, Commissioner. It remains to this day essentially as it was constructed in 1833. The original furniture is of local red cedar.

The rectory, built in 1836 by the Australian Agricultural Company, has managed to maintain is early colonial character despite a fire in 1859 which destroyed the eastern wing and roof. Original design characteristics are windows with small panes, French windows, louvred shutters and verandah incorporated under the main roof.

The church hall, built around 1860, was originally used as a school when the parish school “Quambi” (adjacent, now owned by Great Lakes Council) became overcrowded. The windows are set within a rectangular frame with a semicircle brick relief arch above.

St. John’s graveyard is maintained by St. John’s Church Parish Council. A list of inscriptions can be found on the website of the Australian Cemeteries Index.

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“St. John’s is perhaps the finest and certainly the most intact Anglican Church in Australia which predates the influence of ecclesiology. It is comparable to anything of this scale surviving in England”

Clive Lucas OBE, B.Arch,FRAIA, ERSA